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Graduate Program in Balkan and Eastern Mediterranean Archaeology

BEMA Online Seminars

 

 

Our BEMA-seminars are co-organized by the Department of Archaeology at the New Bulgarian University and the Balkan Heritage Foundation.

They offer a platform - ‘bema’ (βῆμα) means in Greek orators podium - for seminars in Balkan and Eastern Mediterranean Archaeology, anthropology, heritage conservation and management, art history and museum studies. Topics from around the world are also welcome.


The seminars are free and open to the public. For zoom-link please check https://www.bhfieldschool.org/bema-online-seminars



You can watch records of most of our seminars on YouTube 

 


Next seminar:

 

 

 Immersive Technologies for Cultural Heritage

 

by

Stefan Palitov

 

Extended reality, film and cultural practitioner and researcher

 

on Saturday, October 15, 2022

 at 1 pm New York (EDT), 6 pm London, UK (GMT), 8 pm Sofia, Bulgaria (EET)

 

The event will last approximately 90 mins including Q&A.

To register and receive a Zoom link, please go to:

https://www.bhfieldschool.org/bema-online-seminars/immersive-technologies-cultural-heritage

 

Тhis lecture will look into two aspects of applying augmented and virtual reality technologies for the dissemination and remediation of cultural heritage. First, it will explore the historical trajectory of storytelling and how various media have focused on the first-person perspective experience. As a result, contemporary immersive content is a modern iteration of these tendencies, rendered through the latest technology. It will further analyze virtual body adoption and the distinction between augmented, mixed, and virtual reality. Additionally, a basic overview of contemporary technologies will be conducted. The second part of the lecture will go over innovative practices in the cultural field. It will address a range of creative solutions, going into examples that give more insight into the dissemination, presentation, and engagement of cultural heritage through immersive technologies.

 

Previous seminars:

You can watch records of most of our seminars on YouTube 

 

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Attic pottery in ancient Thrace

 

by

Dr. Despoina Tsiafaki

Director of Research at "Athena": Research & Innovation Center in Information, Communication & Knowledge Technologies

 

on Saturday, June 04, 2022

 at 1 pm New York (EDT), 6 pm London, UK (GMT), 8 pm Sofia, Bulgaria (EET)

The event will last approximately 90 mins including Q&A.

To register and receive a Zoom link, please go to:

https://www.bhfieldschool.org/bema-online-seminars/attic-pottery-in-ancient-thrace

 

 Attic vases hold a prominent position within archaeological research and contribute significantly to pottery studies as well as other fields regarding the knowledge of the Past. Attic pottery achieved great popularity during the 6th-4th c. BCE with exports throughout the Mediterranean and the Euxeinos Pontos (Black Sea). Ancient Thrace was among the regions Attic vases were imported systematically and for a long period.

This lecture will deal with the published Attic painted pottery in ancient Thrace as it is presented through the results of the AtticPOT project (http://atticpot.athenarc.gr/index.php/en/). More than 5000 vases and fragments of Attic pots are collected in the AtticPOT repository, revealing the notable presence of the Athenian Kerameikos in the region and its consumption by the inhabitants. Distribution in apoikiae and other coastal and inland settlements, commercial and social networks, preferences, and function of these vases in the local societies will be among the discussed topics.

 

 

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Burial Practices at the Roman and Late Roman Necropoleis of Stobi

 by Dr. Silvana Blazhevska

National Institution Stobi, R. of N. Macedonia

on Saturday, May 07, 2022

 

The ancient city of Stobi located at the confluence of the rivers Axios and Erigon in the northern part of the Roman Province of Macedonia flourished from the time of Augustus until the late 6th or early 7th century when it was abandoned. The systematic excavations conducted at the site over the past 100 years have revealed a prosperous city with lavishly decorated public buildings, private residences and rich moveable finds which provided extensive data for its history, urban development and various aspects of everyday life.

Several burial sites were also excavated at different locations outside and within the city walls, providing evidence for the burial practices of ancient Stobenses. The majority date to the Roman and Late Roman periods, except for a small Hellenistic cemetery discovered below the Late Antique residences House of Peristeria and Domus Fullonica and a small medieval cemetery found above the Civil Basilica.

 

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Sha'ar Hagolan Excavations and Their Impact on our Understanding of the Neolithisation Process in the Southern Levant

 Julien Vieugué and Anna Eirikh-Rose

 

Permanent researcher at the French National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS), Permanent researcher at the Israel Antiquities Authority (IAA)

 

on Saturday, April 02, 2022

 at 1 pm New York (EDT), 6 pm London, UK (GMT), 8 pm Sofia, Bulgaria (EET)

 

 To register your interest and receive a Zoom link, please RSVP to bhfs.admissions@gmail.com

(Please do check your spam/junk inbox if you do not receive a confirmation email within a day.)

 

The Neolithic period represents a decisive stage in the history of the Levantine populations and the Pottery Neolithic period appears to be the culmination of this transformation and, with the introduction of widespread use of pottery vessels, can be considered as another step in Neolithic Revolution. Nonetheless, the beginning of the Pottery Neolithic was one of the lesser-known periods in the Southern Levant. The discovery and intensive excavation of the Early Pottery Neolithic site at Sha’ar Hagolan make important contributions to our understanding of the Neolitisation processes. Because it includes exceptionally well-preserved stratigraphic layers dating of the PPN-PN transition (6700-5900 cal. BC), the site represents a key open-air settlement for reconstructing the history of the earliest potter's communities in the southern Levant. Between 1989 and 2004, Yosef Garfinkel carried out a 3000 sq. m excavation aiming to explore the last occupation phases of the village (6200-5900 cal. BC) and revealed the existence of real living quarters separated by streets, upsetting our knowledge regarding the social organization of the Yarmukian communities at the end of the 7th millennium cal. BC. The current excavation project concerns the early occupation phases of the Neolithic village (6700-6200 cal. BC). The main objective is to identify the origin of the first potters' groups who lived in the Jordan Valley.

 

 

* * * 

 

The Byzantine Legacy

 by

David Hendrix

 Historian & Founder of the Byzantine Legacy website

on Saturday, March 05, 2022

 

 

The Byzantine Legacy project was created with the aim of providing accessible information on the Byzantine monuments of Istanbul. It consists of a website, social media, and a photo archive.

At the beginning of the project in 2015-2016, most of the Byzantine monuments in Istanbul did not have information boards. Many other aspects of Byzantine heritage, such as numerous Greek and Latin inscriptions, were also not accessible to the public. The Byzantine Legacy project includes a website with individual web pages on the monuments of Istanbul, including its land and sea walls, individual churches, palace ruins, and many cisterns. Each page has text summaries on individual monuments, primary sources, translations, recent photos, historic images, plans, and pictures of artifacts from the site. There are also numerous maps based on categories, such as the Byzantine churches of Istanbul, sites in the hinterland of Constantinople, sites in Bithynia, and so forth. While the project currently focuses on Istanbul, there are many other cities, sites, and monuments on the website as well, which will be developed in the future.

 

 

 

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Tell Yunatsite, Souhtern Bulgaria. Recent Excavations and New Insights on the Chalcolithic in Thrace

 

by

Dr. Kamen Boyadzhiev,

 National Archaeological Institute with Museum, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences

on Saturday, February 05, 2022

 

 

The prehistoric tell at Yunatsite in the Maritsa River valley (Southern Bulgaria) is among the biggest tell-sites in the Balkans. During large-scale excavations, a Medieval cemetery, fortifications from the Roman period, and layers from the Iron Аge, Early Bronze Age and Chalcolithic have been revealed.

The studies in the last years are concentrated on the thick Chalcolithic layer, which covers most of the 5th millennium BCE. They reveal a complex settlement and social structure. Long-distance trade and craft specialization have been attested. The copper tools and pottery crucibles suggest local metallurgical production, while a small golden bead dated to the mid-5th millennium BCE is one of the earliest golden artifacts known so far. The final Chalcolithic settlement was destroyed by an enemy attack around 4200 cal. BCE and provides important evidence for the end of the Copper Age cultures in the Balkans.

The presentation highlights the most interesting results from the latest excavations and their significance for understanding the cultural processes, technological innovations and social dynamics in the 5th millennium BCE Balkans.

 

* * *

 

 

The Kitten Shipwreck and Ottoman Period Shipbuilding and Seafaring on the Western Black Sea

 

by

Prof. Kroum Batchvarov, University of Connecticut, Department of Anthropology

on Saturday, January 08, 2022

 at 1 pm New York (EST), 6 pm London, UK (GMT), 8 pm Sofia, Bulgaria (EET)

 

 

* * *

 

The Fate of a Roman Road Station after Antiquity

 

by

 

Alexander Manev

PhD Candidate in Classical Archaeology at National Institute of Archaeology and Museum (NAIM-BAS, Sofia, Bulgaria)

& Balkan Heritage Field School Instructor

 

on Saturday, December 04, 2021

 at 1 pm New York (EST), 6 pm London, UK (GMT), 8 pm Sofia, Bulgaria (EET)

 

 

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Decolonizing

the Study of Material Culture in Ancient Thrace and the Hellenistic Far East

 

by Dr. Richard Wenghofer

Associate Professor of Classical Studies, Nipissing University (North Bay, Ontario, Canada)

 

on Saturday, November 06, 2021

 

 

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Bookbinding workshops

and book archaeology from the library of the Monastery of St Catherine's, Sinai

 

 

by

Dr. Nikolas Sarris

(conservator of paper and archive materials at the National Library of Greece)

 

on Saturday, October 02, 2021

 at 1 pm New York (EDT), 6 pm London, UK (GMT), 8 pm Sofia, Bulgaria (EET)

 

 

 

* * *

 

Phoenicians and Cypriots in the North? Objects, People and Networks in the Northern Aegean Area in the Geometric and Archaic Periods 

 

by

Dr. Petya Ilieva

 

Bulgarian Academy of Sciencies, Institute of Balkan Studies

on

Thursday, June 10, 2021

 at 1 pm New York (EST), 6 pm London, UK (GMT), 8 pm Sofia, Bulgaria (EET)

 

 

 

 

 

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A Microcosm of Roman Thrace’s Metropolis: Formative Urban Interactions in the Theater at Philippopolis

 

by

Dr. Matthew Shueller,

 

Department of Classical Studies, The University of North Carolina at Greensboro (April 2021)

 

 

 

 

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Past and Present Studies of the Submerged Mesambria, Present-day Nessebar, a UNESCO World Heritage Site

 

by
Dr. Nayden Prahov,
Director of the Center for Underwater Archaeology in Sozopol, Bulgaria &
Founding Member of the Balkan Heritage Foundation (March 2021)

 

 

* * *

 

 

Early Byzantine Monastery on the Western Black Sea Coast near the City of Odessos (Varna, Bulgaria)

by
Dr. Vassil Tenekedjiev,

Balkan Heritage Foundation Branch Manager - Varna, Assistant professor at the Department of Archaeology, Varna Regional Museum of History (March 2021)

 

Watch on YouTube

 

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Recent research on the transitional Middle to Upper Paleolithic period in North Bulgaria: the earliest modern Homo sapiens from Bacho Kiro Cave in comparison with the data from Kozarnika and Temnata caves

by
 Dr. Tsenka Tsanova,

Department of Human Evolution Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig (March 2021)

 

 

 Watch on YouTube

 

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Trypillia megasites from the 4th millennium BCE in the Ukrainian forest steppe. Can a single site tell us something about early urbanism?

 by

Dr. Bisserka Gaydarska,

Durham / NBU (Feb 2021)

 

Watch on YouTube